ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: KID CIRCUS

 

‘The way one person sees the world can be completely different to how another sees it.’ 

 

Is photography something you've always been into or was there ever a switch over from something else?

 Actually, no. I always admired anyone who knew how to use a camera (I’m old enough to have been around before smartphones and their ability to take decent pictures!)

My background before photography was that I trained in performing arts. Whilst at college, I used a student loan to buy my first set of turntables and thus began a deep dive into DJing, which I pursued after I left college. However, thinking back I do remember on train commutes I’d occasionally see someone who looked interesting to me and wished I had the skills I have now to be able to approach them and ask to take their portrait. 

When I really got into taking pictures with my first iPhone, a friend of mine who is an event photographer advised me to look into mirrorless cameras – cameras that you could use different lenses with but were usually smaller and way less expensive than normal DSLRs. I promptly sold a long-treasured synthesiser I’d used in my music production on eBay and used the profit I made to buy my first camera. 

Do you think your surroundings and exposure to things throughout your life influence your art? If yes, in what way and why?

Yes! I think this can apply to anyone creating art of any kind. It makes me laugh when I see a post by a photographer whose work I love on Instagram, and one of the comments is by someone asking them what camera they used, not just out of mild curiosity but you get the impression they think that particular camera will make them a better photographer. Good gear is helpful, but you’re not gonna take the same picture of the same subject as me using the same camera. The way one person sees the world can be completely different to how another sees it. 

For me, I do think coming from training in performing arts, being heavily into DJing and music production, growing up in London, the places I’ve travelled to and whatever other life experiences I’ve had has undoubtedly influenced my art.

Has lockdown changed how you're going to go about business in the future?

I think lockdown has given me a really good opportunity to generally take stock of where I’m at, what kind of work I want to do more of and yes, definitely how I do business in future. It has also been a period in which I’ve connected with a whole bunch of people that I may not have encountered in any other circumstances.

You have a unique style of shooting, what do you think are the main components to developing a style of your own?

Thanks! It’s so hard to get an objective perspective of the stuff you create, and I’m sure this is something many creatives feel about their own work. As regards developing a style of your own, I can only speak from my own perspective; for me, the trying out of different styles of photography (I started being heavily into architecture, landscape and later street photography) really helped me develop my eye and also distill what I was and wasn’t into as regards types of photography, ways of shooting different subjects even ways of editing final images.

From only a brief chat with you it's obvious you are confident and focused on your craft. What insights/advice would you give to new and emerging photographers wanting to pursue it as a career?

Be obsessive, haha. I can’t lie, I really was at the beginning. Was constantly reading blogs and watching Youtube tutorial videos because I wanted to get better and better. I still do now, haha. Even when I was still doing landscape photography, I would think nothing of getting up at crack of dawn if I thought the weather was going to promise me that money-shot sunrise image of Tower Bridge. Also, really try different styles of photography because you really don’t know which will pique and retain your interest. I had no idea I would eventually become passionate about portrait and fashion photography until I tried it a couple of times and unexpectedly loved it. And SHOOT…SHOOT…SHOOT. Seriously, the more you shoot the better you’ll get and the more you’ll learn about yourself as a photographer. Last point (promise) is that it’s really useful to buy magazines or subscribe to newsletters that publish content similar to the types of photography you eventually want to make a living from. That way you get an insight into the standard that will be expected of a photographer in the field you wish to pursue.

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